GRABACIONES DE CORELLI ( C.D.) - STUDIO
 
GRABACIONES DE CORELLI ( C.D.) - STUDIO
 
FRANCO CORELLI "LA VOZ DEL SIGLO XX"
FRANCO CORELLI "ROLES"
FRANCO CORELLI "ROLES II"
FRANCO CORELLI "RETRATOS"
FRANCO CORELLI "PRINCIPE DE LOS TENORES"
FRANCO CORELLI "COMPAÑEROS"
FRANCO CORELLI "ON STAGE"
FRANCO CORELLI "ANDREA CHENIER"
FRANCO CORELLI "TENOR DEL MUNDO"
FRANCO CORELLI 1921
FRANCO CORELLI "HOY"
"FRANCO CORELLI REPRESENTACIONES"
FRANCO CORELLI "PRIMO TENORE"
FRANCO CORELLI "SUPERESTRELLA"
FRANCO CORELLI "IL TROVATORE"
FRANCO CORELLI "TURANDOT"
MI NOMBRE ES DARIO CORELLI
BRAVO TENORE!!!!
CORELLI "LA VOCE DI ORO"
FRANCO CORELLI "REPERTORIO"
FRANCO CORELLI "80 AÑOS" 1921
ENTREVISTA CON FRANCO CORELLI
GRABACIONES DE CORELLI (C.D.) - LIVE
GRABACIONES DE CORELLI ( C.D. ) -STUDIO
GRABACIONES DE CORELLI ( C.D.) - STUDIO
GRABACIONES DE CORELLI(C.D.)-LIVE
DISCOGRAFIA DE CORELLI ( C.D. )
GRABACIONES DE CORELLI ( C.D. ) - LIVE
DISCOGRAFIA DE CORELLI ( C. D. ) -STUDIO
DISCOGRAFIA DE CORELLI ( C.D. )-STUDIO
DISCOGRAFIA DE CORELLI ( C.D. )
GRABACIONES DE CORELLI ( VIDEOS ).
HOMENAJE A SUS 80 AÑOS.

   

 
Compositor: George Frideric Handel, Gioachino Rossini, Giuseppe Verdi, Tortorella, Wilder, Louis Niedermeyer, Anonymous, Charles Gounod, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Franz Schubert.
Singer: Franco Corelli.
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Compositor:Umberto giordano
Andrea Chénier, Franco Corelli; Maddalena di Coigny, Antonietta Stella; Carlo Gérard, Mario Sereni; Bersi, Stefania Malagù; ;Incredibile/L;Abate, Piero de Palma; Orchestra & Chorus del Teatro dell Opera di Roma; Gabriele Santini, Conductor
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Unequalled Neopolitan Songs
Franco Corelli, who sang from 1951 to 1975, was the greatest tenore di forza of the postwar era. A powerful and exciting singer, never a subtle, elegant, or refined one, he had his detractors (who called him crude, vulgar, self-indulgent, and who lambasted his execrable French), but there can be no argument about the quality of his voice, a big, vibrant tenor with a thrilling timbre (often described as rich, dark, or baritonal) and a brilliant, secure top that must have been the envy and despair of other tenors. A nervous performer repeatedly subject to pre-performance jitters and anxiety attacks (a wag once said of him that Corelli could always think of more reasons not to sing than to sing), once onstage he was a generous singer who gave fully of himself and, like Caruso, poured out his magnificent voice unstintingly, never holding back.
The voice itself was one of the glories of the generously-endowed operatic scene of the Fifties and Sixties, and one of greatest tenor voices of the century. Herbert von Karajan said of Corelli, "A voice of heroic power, yet with great beauty of tone; darkly sensuous, mysteriously melancholic . . . but above all, a voice of thunder and lightning, fire and blood." Harold C. Schonberg, senior music of the New York Times, reviewing Corelli's Metropolitan debut in 1961, noted that his voice "has something of an exciting animal drive about it, and when Mr. Corelli lets loose, he can dominate an ensemble," and later described his voice as "a force of nature, an act of God, the vocal equivalent of an earthquake, volcano or hurricane." The distinguished musicologist Paul Henry Lang writing in the New York Herald-Tribune called Corelli "a latter-day Caruso." Alan Rich of the New York Herald-Tribune wrote of him, "There is no tenor in modern times, Italian or otherwise, whose voice rings out with greater vibrancy, whose every tone carries with it emotion at white heat. The sounds he makes, seemingly without effort, are dazzlingly bright, urgent, and communicative." Since Corelli's retirement we haven't heard anything remotely like him, and those of us who know his voice (and Bjorling's) can perhaps be pardoned for finding the "three tenors" so popular today somewhat anemic in comparison.

I have been an admirer of Corelli, a collector of his recordings, and a follower of his career since the late 1950s (when he had not yet sung in America, and his only recordings were Italian Cetra imports). I have just about everything he recorded. There is no tenor voice before the public today equal to this one, and I urge you not to miss it.

But the two-CD set under review here is not the place to start. If you are new to Corelli, I recommend the EMI single CD "Heroes" or the EMI two-CD set "Franco Corelli," with their heavy doses of his typical operatic fare, as ideal introductions to this rewarding singer. Corelli was above all a creature of the opera house, in his element singing Puccini, Verdi, and verismo Italian opera. The set under review here, misleadingly entitled "Songs and Arias," contains in fact only one aria, a very atypical one: Handel's "Ombra mai fu" from "Serse" (made famous by a Caruso recording). Indeed, some of the composers represented here-Handel, Schubert, Bach, Mozart, Rossini-are in fact stylistically very far from the kind of singing one associates with Corelli. A couple of the songs, "Because" and Grieg's "I Love Thee," are mildly comical in Corelli's overpoweringly Italianate and operatic renditions. But this is a set well worth owning for anyone who knows and likes Corelli. There is a first-rate Ingemisco from the Verdi Requiem, the traditional religious songs are all sung with seriousness and devotion, and most important, the bulk of the set comprises Neopolitan songs, which Corelli sings superbly. (I think he sings them better than anyone.) Of these my own favorite is "Core n'grato," a powerful song, and Corelli's recording of it is unequalled: there is a prodigious outpouring of bronzen tone here that must be heard to be believed. It's true that some of the orchestral arrangements are corny and dated, but with gloriously gutsy, full-blooded singing like this, from one of the greatest tenor voices of the century in its prime (all the recordings here are from 1961 to 1965), I can overlook the arrangements. These two CDs are very generously filled (22 songs,77 minutes for one and 23 songs, 78 minutes for the other), and include, I believe, everything Corelli recorded for EMI that wasn't opera.

If you like Corelli, if you like Neopolitan songs, you'll want this. But it's not the place to start in appreciating Franco Corelli.
CORELLI IS THE GREATEST
FRANCO CORELLI IS MAGNIFICENT ON THESE TWO CDS. HIS VOICE IS SO POWERFUL IT IS UNBELEIVABLE.HE IS SURELY THE GREATEST SINGER OF ALL TIME. IF YOU THINK PAVAROTTI IS GOOD AT SINGING 'O SOLE MIO' THEN CORELLI'S VERSION ON THIS CD WILL BLOW YOU AWAY. AT THE END OF THE SONG HE SINGS THE LAST LINE A NOTE HIGHER (HIGH C) WITH SUCH FEROCITY IT IS LIKE NOTHING ELSE ON EARTH. THIS GUY HAS A TALENT THAT IS SURELY A GIFT FROM GOD. HE IS MAGNIFICENT. A REAL DIVO!
 
Traditional critical opinion has it that Andrea Chénier is a very bad opera. We at The Society can't figure out why. A tale of love and political intrigue set against the backdrop of the French Revolution, it has all the elements for success: a deftly woven and dramatically compelling story, incisive and poignant music, and gratifying rôles for its principal singers, especially its lead tenor. Neither its characters, its psychological motivations, nor its philosophical underpinning can be thought of as "stock." The epithets of "unidimensional," or "simplistic," surely don't apply. Among other themes, Andrea Chénier chronicles the journey from revolutionary idealism to disillusion, cynicism, and a most unrevolutionarylike kind of duplicitiousness.
So why the bad press?
We can only assume that it has more to do with semantics, musical partisanship, and shifting operatic tastes than with the intrinsic worth of this, arguably Giordano's finest piece. It is a verismo opera ; an example of the type founded by Mascagni in his Cavalleria rusticana. Like Bizet's trailblazing Carmen, it shows a realistic, not an idealized, view of life. Verismo operas are invariably tragic, and though they were extremely popular at the turn of our century, an age-old argument as to whether opera should be down-and-dirty realistic, or should strive to "elevate" their audiences toward higher and finer things, raged then as now. The conservatives, at least in the press, seemed to win out.
It was a Pyhrric victory.
Composers the stature of Verdi and Puccini were not above incorporating verismo elements into their finest creations, and audiences have found all of those works, including Andrea Chénier, just fine. Mozart would have smiled.
This recording has, among its other virtues, one particularly matchless element ; the vocal art of Franco Corelli. The largely lyric tenor role of Chenier demands a sweet but dark-toned voice that can be pushed, where required, into Heldentenor realms. The unflappable Corelli negotiates his music with smooth mastery, aplomb, and sheer delight in its dramatic sweep. To this day he has a cult following; one partially due to his handsome stage presence, his skillfully subtle acting, but most significantly, to his incomparable singing.
If you know this opera in different performance, or, if it is totally new to you, we can think of no better way to be drawn into its wonders.
Bellini: Norma:Meco all;altar di Venere;Me protegge, me difende; Cilea: Adriana Lecouvreur; L;anima ho stanca; Donizetti: La Favorita: Spirto gentil; Giordano: Andrea Chénier ; Colpito qui m;avete;Un dì all;azzuro spazio; Legray! Andrea Chénier!;Sì, fui soldato; Come un bel dì di maggio; Gounod: Roméo & Juliette: Ah! lève-toi, soleil!; Leoncavallo: Pagliacci ; Vesti la giubba; Mascagni: Cavalleria rusticana; Intanto amici;Viva il vino spumeggiante; Mamma, quel vino è generoso; Meyerbeer: Gli Ugonotti: Bianca al par di neve alpina; Puccini: Turandot: Nessun dorma!; Tosca: Recondita armonia; E lucevan le stelle; Manon Lescaut: Donna non vidi mai; Verdi: Aida: Se quel guerrier io fossi!;Celeste Aïda; Il Trovatore: Ah sì, ben mio;Di quella pira.

Franco Corelli, Tenor with various assisting artists.
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To all of you who came of age in the Pavarotti/Domingo/ Carreras era, this collection will be a revelation a grouping of arias and ensembles featuring some of opera's most compelling heroic roles sung by Franco Corelli, one of this century's true heroes of vocal art.

Franco Corelli came to music late in life, at age 23. He was an autodidact who learned his craft from by studying recordings by older tenors, primarily Enrico Caruso, on whom he modeled his own vocal style. He eventually got to La Scala by dint of sheer talent and persistence. With his matinee-idol good looks, his natural acting ability, but most important, his golden tenor voice, he thrilled Metropolitan Opera audiences every season from 1961 to 1974.

In this collection, spanning recordings made in a variety of venues between 1960 and 1968 ; at the apex of Corelli's prime ; one is treated to seamless legatos, an infinite variety of vocal colors, and the kind of psychological insight that shows not only the strength, fearlessness, and valor of true heroism, but its gallantry, warmth, and loving tenderness as well.

Webster's II, New Riverside University Dictionary defines a hero as:A mythological or legendary figure, often of divine ancestry, who is favored by the gods, endowed with great courage and strength, and celebrated for his bold exploits.

Franco Corelli's incomparable vocal art shows us how utterly inadequate that definition can be.